Faith

My Tebow Rambling

It seems that right now everyone has an opinion on Tim Tebow. People who are not even sports fans are being pushed into choosing a side. Since many have written about him or shared their opinion, I thought I’d throw in my two cents. My guess is that many others believe that if Tebow threw in his two cents, it probably would wobble through the air and miss its target completely. He’d probably have to run his two cents in.

Here is my opinion on Tebow and his team. Tim Tebow plays for the Denver Broncos and the Denver Broncos played the Cleveland Browns on January 11, 1987 in the AFC championship. The winner of that game would go on to play in the Super Bowl. The Broncos quarterback at that time was John Elway. In the last 6 minutes of regulation, Elway moved his team 98 yards down the field to score and tie the game. The Broncos went on to win by a field goal in overtime. The next year, on January 17, 1988, the Broncos played the Browns once again in the AFC championship. The Browns moved their way down the field and this time were about to be the ones to score a game-tying touchdown. Unfortunately, Ernest Byner fumbled on the two yard line with 1:12 left in the game and the Broncos won. So, for those two reasons, I despise the Broncos. When I’m on an airplane and the plane flies over Mile High Stadium, I always make sure to use the restroom, in the hopes that when I flush, something gross will leak out over the field.  Yes, I know forgiveness is an essential aspect of Christianity, but those are two hard pills to swallow.

Okay, I was wrong. It looks like I’ve got more opinions on the Broncos. Everyone that writes about Tebow usually starts by saying, “he’s a great kid, but…” And it is true, Tebow is a standout guy. And with all the horrible things that are going on in sports, it’s great to see all that he is doing. It is impossible to open up a paper or click on a sports website without reading about the molestation cases at Syracuse and Penn State. Spousal abuse, gun charges, bar fights, and various other ill behaviors by athletes are constantly covered. In contrast, Tebow has led fundraisers that have opened over a dozen orphanages in third-world countries (even though they have possibly the worse name for an orphanage — Uncle Dick’s Home). Tebow is also the driving force behind a hospital being built in the Philippines that will open next year. The hospital will treat those that can’t afford medical care. What a jerk!

But Tebow is getting a lot of criticism for the way he plays football. I’d like to point out that he is getting paid 1.62 million dollars this year, plus more in bonuses. You could make fun of me all you want and even throw eggs at me as I walk down the street if you pay me that much. Of course, I doubt being a stay-at-home dad would generate that much criticism from anyone other than those that live in my house. So, don’t cry too much Tebow fans; he’s not crying.

Now people are starting to say that Tebow is winning games because of divine influence. I’d say that Lovie Smith, the coach of the Chicago Bears (who just suffered a loss to the Denver Broncos) might have issues with that. I mean come on, his name is Lovie! Coach Smith is also a Christian and heads a foundation that helps kids receive quality education and life skills. Do people believe that God loves Tebow more than Coach Smith? There is a fear that I have, and that is when Christians get behind something, they tend to beat it death and the rest of the world begins to hate it. Just look at Christmas, fish tattoos, and Creed.

The fact is, Tebow doesn’t really fit the profile.  Throughout the Bible, God constantly uses people that the world deems unworthy — Rahab was a prostitute, Moses had a stutter, David was a shepherd (and a murdered/adulterer), Jesus was the “illegitimate” son of a poor teenage girl, and the list goes on and on. I don’t think there is anything ordinary or unworthy about Tebow. He has been given special physical gifts and he uses them. Yes, I know he uses them to glorify God and has used his fame to help others and I commend him for that. But does God really care that much about football? Right now there are wars being fought, people are being oppressed, bullied, beaten, and killed. Every continent in the world is facing injustices, including our own. So on Sundays, I have a hard time believing that God halts everything and puts his hands on Tebow and pushes him through a goal line when there is so much else going on in the world.

You can’t tell me… Wait a minute. Oh no! It is becoming clear. All my ramblings are for nothing. I wasted my time writing this and you wasted your time reading this. Why?  You tell me – what did God do on the Sabbath? He rested. That means he is watching football on Sundays!  (I’m aware that traditionally the Sabbath was actually Saturday, but not in modern day Christianity.)  This means… that God is a Denver Broncos fan! This also means that God dislikes the Cleveland Browns, which makes perfect sense now.

In a nutshell, here is my point. You don’t have to have the perfect physical tools to be used by God to do great things, and if you do have them you better use them. Christians should take it easy on their backing of Tebow, because let’s face it, we can be pretty annoying sometimes. And finally, God doesn’t like Cleveland. Maybe Tebow should pray for the Browns.

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9 comments

  1. I agreed with almost everything you said right up until the end. I don’t think Christians should take it easy in backing Tebow. We should always be supportive of Christians who take a stand… Whether it is Tebow or Mark Richt of the Ga Bulldogs or Kirk Cameron in Hollywood. It is a breath of fresh air to see people live what they believe. It doesn’t mean God is more for them than any other Christian tho I agree. The Bible does say tho ” If God is for us who can be against us?” I respect those that actually believe and live this……

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  2. Nice balance of humor insight. Good point about God using people we wouldn’t expect and Tebow not fitting that model. I hadn’t thought about that.

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  3. Nice work, Jason. You’d be an interesting person to get to know as an adult! I just have the childhood memory of you in my data-bank!

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    1. Interesting, Sarah. But I am a little cosufned. “Rights” language used by feminists (and just about everybody in the humanities and social study disciplines) seem to refer to certain basic living conditions. Are you against the notion of basic living conditions? Obviously, what those are exactly can be and are debated. But feminists have done some good work advocating certain basic conditions, such as voting (as you say) and other issues such as working in an environment without sexual harassment, fair wages, education, property, temperance, child labor, racial justice, and the like. I suspect we would agree that these are good things, and we would also agree these good things do not imply all feminist issues raised are good, of course. Each issue should be evaluated by its own light. But is your issue with the concept of rights or the word itself? I take it you are making the point that humans are not *ultimately* in control. God owns everything and is ultimately in control. But of course humans do have some measure of control over things (all according to God’s will, of course) and it seems good and fair that a person earning a wage should be able to reap the fruit of his/her labor. I take it the concept of basic human conditions and the ultimate sovereignty of God and the fact that all life is by grace are not incompatible. In fact, Christians have strongly supported the notion of human rights based on the imago dei. Any thoughts on this? Interesting piece, here! Thanks Sarah.Interesting, Sarah. But I am a little cosufned. Rights language used by feminists (and just about everybody in the humanities and social study disciplines) seem to refer to certain basic living conditions. Are you against the notion of basic living conditions? Obviously, what those are exactly can be and are debated. But feminists have done some good work advocating certain basic conditions, such as voting (as you say) and other issues such as working in an environment without sexual harassment, fair wages, education, property, temperance, child labor, racial justice, and the like. I suspect we would agree that these are good things, and we would also agree these good things do not imply all feminist issues raised are good, of course. Each issue should be evaluated by its own light. But is your issue with the concept of rights or the word itself? I take it you are making the point that humans are not *ultimately* in control. God owns everything and is ultimately in control. But of course humans do have some measure of control over things (all according to God’s will, of course) and it seems good and fair that a person earning a wage should be able to reap the fruit of his/her labor. I take it the concept of basic human conditions and the ultimate sovereignty of God and the fact that all life is by grace are not incompatible. In fact, Christians have strongly supported the notion of human rights based on the imago dei. Any thoughts on this? Interesting piece, here! Thanks Sarah.

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